Why fret

Inside his overcoat, under his chequered hat, Monk is lost and doesn’t care if he’s never found. Doesn’t give a good Goddamn. His fingers stab at single notes, crush chords; roll with the tide then tighten down. His hands seek and find warm spaces lost between the keys, laughter strung across the dark like lights of fishermen spaced out along the beach, phosphorescence on the sea, like Whistler’s Nocturne in Blue and Gold, the glow of radio stations long into the night….. C minor, F 7th, B flat -nothing can be bluer than this.

—Bluer Than This by John Harvey

N. TURTURRO STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 
Filed Aug. 1, 1923 
Patented Aug. 6, 1929.

N. TURTURRO STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 

Filed Aug. 1, 1923 

Patented Aug. 6, 1929.

Ukubidon

Ukubidon

supruntu:

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Le Trombe del giudizio

supruntu:

Michelangelo Pistoletto, Le Trombe del giudizio

Late 17th century—France: An engraving by Nicolas de Larmessin from a series called Les costumes grotesques et les métiers.
Via kimballtrombone.com

Late 17th century—France: An engraving by Nicolas de Larmessin from a series called Les costumes grotesques et les métiers.
Via kimballtrombone.com

Pitchfork: Do you have a favorite instrument?
Tom Waits: I have a Chamberlain I bought from some surfers in Westwood many years ago. It’s an early analog synthesizer, it operates on tape loops. It has 60 voices — everything from galloping horses to owls to rain to every instrument in the orchestra. Including the human voice [Waits sings a scale in “synthesizer voice”]. Eleven-second samples! I like primitive things. I’ve used that a lot over the years on different recordings.
I have a Stroh violin. Stroh is the guy who created the violin with the horn attached to the bridge. This was around when orchestras played primarily in pits. In old theaters, the string players would complain that they couldn’t be heard in the balcony. So this guy created the Stroh violin, which was a way of amplifying sound before electricity. It sounds almost like the violin is coming out of the horn of a 78 record player. He made Stroh basses, Stroh cellos. He even has a one-string Stroh violin. Those are interesting. I used one on a record calledAlice.
Via TomWaitsFan. From 2006 interview on Pitchfork by Amanda Petrusich. Photo by Michael O’Bien

Pitchfork: Do you have a favorite instrument?

Tom Waits: I have a Chamberlain I bought from some surfers in Westwood many years ago. It’s an early analog synthesizer, it operates on tape loops. It has 60 voices — everything from galloping horses to owls to rain to every instrument in the orchestra. Including the human voice [Waits sings a scale in “synthesizer voice”]. Eleven-second samples! I like primitive things. I’ve used that a lot over the years on different recordings.

I have a Stroh violin. Stroh is the guy who created the violin with the horn attached to the bridge. This was around when orchestras played primarily in pits. In old theaters, the string players would complain that they couldn’t be heard in the balcony. So this guy created the Stroh violin, which was a way of amplifying sound before electricity. It sounds almost like the violin is coming out of the horn of a 78 record player. He made Stroh basses, Stroh cellos. He even has a one-string Stroh violin. Those are interesting. I used one on a record calledAlice.

Via TomWaitsFan. From 2006 interview on Pitchfork by Amanda Petrusich. Photo by Michael O’Bien